Unlike THC, which primarily binds to CB-1 receptors located in the brain, CBD works in the body by manipulating receptors throughout organ tissues, the immune system, the pain response system, the hormonal system, and other whole-body regulatory systems. Basically, since its receptors have been found to exist in virtually every cell and tissue type in the body, CBD is believed to work on every aspect of human health and behavior – from the subcellular level to the whole-body leve and beyond.

If your animal has a tendency to panic, then you should be wary of any product that contains THC, since, for some animals and people, that cannabinoid can elicit a panic response. CBD, on the other hand, has been proven to help regulate panic. A 2017 article in Current Neuropharmacology reviewed both experimental lab animal and human studies, and researchers concluded that “CBD seems to be a promising drug for the treatment of PD [panic disorder].”

Other potential side effects include low blood pressure, lightheadedness, and drowsiness, but these have typically only occurred in patients who have exceeded doses of 1,500 mg daily for a period of 4 weeks or more; far more than the average person will need take on a daily basis for chronic pain symptoms. (In fact, the majority of CBD users claim they find an effective dose to be anywhere between 10 and 40 mg daily).

Truth be told, one of the biggest draws to using CBD oil for pain has been the fact that it has little distinguishable side-effects or contraindications with other medications. In fact, in a massive report that was published by the World Health Organization during last year’s 2017 Expert Committee on Drug Dependence, it was (finally) declared to the world that CBD is a “safe, well tolerated [compound, which] is not associated with any significant adverse public health effects.”
Manufacturing CBD oil with zero THC is a complex and costly process. Remember that we answered the question, “Is CBD legal” with the disclaimer that it must contain less than 0.3% THC to comply with federal law. However, many companies take shortcuts and cut corners during the production process to save costs, ending up with CBD that contains significant THC – even if they claim otherwise.
In the United States, CBD itself is not specifically listed in the United States Controlled Substances Act like the psychoactive compound, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The US government, which specifies which parts of cannabis plants are prohibited, excludes hemp’s “mature stalks” and “oil or cake made from the seeds” and “sterilized seeds” from its definition of “marihuana.”
So. According to the Controlled Substance Act definition itself, certain parts of the cannabis plant are clearly illegal, while others fall into a grayer area. One of these – for the most part – is CBD extracted from the “legal” parts of the cannabis plant, and non-marijuana industrial hemp plants, which, as defined by Section 7606 of the Farm Bill are cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC.
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