Taking CBD orally or vaping it is a great way to address a number of health issues, including sleeplessness, chronic pain and anxiety. But there’s another way to benefit from the power of CBD: topically. There are many topical applications available, including balms, salves, lotions and oils. They will help soothe your skin, calm your nerves, relax your mind and leave you feeling radiant. Warning: due to their popularity, CBD topicals are flooding the market. Finding the best products for your needs can be daunting. This top ten list will get you started.
Transparency: Fab’s website features third-party lab results for most products. They only have a lab test for one of their tinctures though (which shows results for cannabinoid potency, as well as contaminants like pesticides). Customer service pointed out that the same CBD oil is used for all their products, but since potencies do vary, we appreciate companies that show potency testing for all products.
Like humans, animals can suffer from all manner of chronic pain, and this 2015 review of the scientific literature on chronic pain and cannabinoid usage found that seven out of eleven high-quality trials showed cannabinoids to have “a significant analgesic effect.” Researchers also reported that “several trials also demonstrated improvement in secondary outcomes (e.g., sleep, muscle stiffness, and spasticity).”
Thank you for the information.  A friend of mine recently gave me a small bottle of Cloud 9 hemp, lizard king.  Said she was told it is good for COPD.  Can not find anything that backs up that statement, You article also said that Cloud 9 is a brand that uses Propylene and the effects on the lungs when vaporizing has not been determined but OK to use externally.  Is all this correct?
So. According to the Controlled Substance Act definition itself, certain parts of the cannabis plant are clearly illegal, while others fall into a grayer area. One of these – for the most part – is CBD extracted from the “legal” parts of the cannabis plant, and non-marijuana industrial hemp plants, which, as defined by Section 7606 of the Farm Bill are cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC.
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