The CBD industry is still extremely new. The terminology hasn’t been officially sorted out yet, so each company kind of comes up with their own method of categorizing their products. As always, make sure that you do your own research before you buy anything. If you’re unsure, email the company’s customer service before you buy. Most CBD companies have good customer service teams and they’ll be happy to help.
Outside of those four states, consumers must put their trust in the manufacturer. Sometimes that’s warranted, and sometimes it’s not. In 2016 and 2016, the FDA ran tests on several CBD products and found that many of the products had far less CBD than advertised, and in some cases none at all. You can find those test results here for 2015, and here for 2016. (These FDA tests were done as a one-off project. CBD products are not approved by the FDA for the prevention, mitigation, or treatment of any disease or condition.)
The science behind CBD is in the relatively early stages. As a cannabinoid, we know that CBD interacts with receptors in your endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system is integrated throughout your body — and this widespread, whole-body interaction creates a broad range of effects. Hence, the long list of possible benefits.   We may still be in the early stages of discovery, but there’s plenty of scientific studies and anecdotal evidence that CBD provides relief for an array of ailments. Here’s a non-exhaustive list of some potential benefits of CBD oil:

Transparency: Fab’s website features third-party lab results for most products. They only have a lab test for one of their tinctures though (which shows results for cannabinoid potency, as well as contaminants like pesticides). Customer service pointed out that the same CBD oil is used for all their products, but since potencies do vary, we appreciate companies that show potency testing for all products.


Furthermore, your product is offered for conditions that are not amenable to self-diagnosis and treatment by individuals who are not medical practitioners; therefore, adequate directions for use cannot be written so that a layperson can use this drug safely for its intended purposes. Thus, ______ is misbranded within the meaning of section 502(f)(1) of the Act, in that its labeling fails to bear adequate directions for use [21 U.S.C. § 352(f)(1)]. The introduction of a misbranded drug into interstate commerce is a violation of section 301(a) of the Act [21 U.S.C. § 331(a)].

In fact, as part of a statement to Rolling Stone magazine in October 2017, experts at Steep Hill Labs (an independent cannabis analysis company with several locations across the U.S.) suggested that vaping CBD oil may cause these waxes to collect in the lungs and form solidified granulomas at some point down the road. While this is no more than speculation (there haven’t been any clinical studies to verify whether or not this is the case), it’s definitely cause enough for concern.
At the top of our ranking is Portland-based Lazarus Naturals, which has honed a reputation for high-quality, affordable CBD. Their consciously crafted CBD is sourced from organic, Oregon-grown hemp which the company controls from seed to sale. With low prices, a robust assistance program, free shipping, and a 30-day, no questions asked return policy, you really can’t go wrong with Lazarus Naturals.

Unfortunately, that huge variety of products comes with some drawbacks. Trying to sift through the different products, concentrations, serving sizes, and brands to find a high-quality, pure CBD oil that fits your needs can be a true task, especially for newcomers. Even if you’ve previously used CBD, it can be difficult to determine which brands are reputable and which ones aren’t.


The color of CBD oil drops can range from clear or slightly golden, to a dark brown almost black. Several factors determine the finished product color, including the type of CBD extract, the extraction method used, the carrier oil used, and additional ingredients. Full spectrum (whole plant) extracts tend to be darker in color, whereas isolates tend to be more transparent.
“There is a great deal of confusion regarding the legal status of hemp and why these products are so readily available versus marijuana-based CBD products. In 2014, the Farm Bill stated that hemp was different from marijuana, yet the Drug Enforcement Agency’s (DEA) position is that hemp comes from the cannabis sativa plant and as such falls under the controlled substance act. In 2004, the Hemp Industry Association won a court case against the DEA from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals that ruled the DEA didn’t have the authority to ban hemp under the CSA. “By that federal court ruling, similar to non-scheduled hemp food products, this allows Medical Marijuana, Inc. (including  HempMeds®) to sell online and distribute to customers in the U.S. states,” said Dr. Stuart Titus, the company’s Chief Executive Officer.”
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