“All parts of the plant Cannabis sativa L., whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of such plant; and every compound manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such plant, its seeds or resins; but shall not include the mature stalks of such plant fiber produced from such stalks oil or cake made from the seeds of such plant, any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such mature stalks (except the resin extracted therefrom),fiber, oil or cake, or the sterilized seed of such plant which is incapable of germination.”

If vaping or dabbing just isn’t your thing, there’s no better CBD product than Weller’s Coconut Bites. The small and discreet packaging fits neatly in your pocket, purse or gym bag and makes receiving calming CBD as simple as nibbling on a snack-sized Bite. Satisfyingly sweet and crunchy, they’re available in three delicious flavors: original, dark chocolate and caramel.

Way, John. It’s amazing how life can be running along great one day, you’re bothering no one, loving others, minding your own business, enjoying your work and then one crooked cop can railroad you. This cop who screwed me over–Robert Bifano– failed to arrest a suicidal AWOL soldier a few years ago and the guy went on to kill his wife and then shot himself. Bifano got sued for his ineptitude.
Vaping is one of the most bioavailable methods in delivering CBD throughout the body. During inhalation, CBD enters through the lungs and diffuses directly into the circulatory system. In contrast to the 30-60 minutes it generally takes for an edible to kick in, the timely efficiency of vaping is vastly superior. And while we’re comparing CBD edibles to CBD vapes, consider this: the same beneficial effects can be achieved with a much smaller amount of CBD by vaping. The CBD transfer from lungs to bloodstream is far more efficient than sending CBD through the liver where its absorbed and broken down by enzymes – a process that can remove the potency of cannabidiol.
House Bill 2107 was brought during the 2017 legislative session with a number of vocal supporters. The bill sought to remove the “low THC” restriction and amend the law to allow for “medicinal marijuana.” It also sought to expand the types of conditions that can be treated with cannabis by including post-traumatic stress disorder and terminal cancer. Finally, the bill sought to modify the language, from requiring a doctor’s prescription to requiring a doctor’s recommendation. This change intended to address concerns about the legality of physicians prescribing something prohibited by federal law. Despite having 77 sponsors and co-sponsors, 29 of whom were Republican, the bill died in committee. Given strong support, as well as national trends, changes in Texas law are likely to occur in the future.

Moreover, a patient survey conducted by Project CBD, declared that “…cannabis appears to be an effective pain management tool with few negative side effects.” The study went on to say that a “…significant decrease in opiate usage among elderly patients while taking medical cannabis [was observed during trial].” In short, it has been portrayed clearly numerous times through valid and well-publicized clinical studies that cannabis is a practical option in terms of efficient pain management.

Hemp-derived CBD oil products will not get you "high" since they contain little or no THC, the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis. They are also now federally legal in the United States following the signing of the 2018 Farm Bill. More medical research studies are needed, but we expect that these products will continue to gain even more mainstream acceptance over time.


Research on CBD and anxiety has generally looked at cannabis as a whole product, not as CBD as a standalone compound. Some studies suggest that it can help with anxiety: like this 2011 study that suggests CBDcan reduce social anxiety or this 2015 review that says CBD could be promising for many forms of anxiety. It’s also important to consider whether the CBD comes from the cannabis plant and therefore may include THC, a cannabinoid that for some, induces anxiety. Read our comprehensive article on CBD and anxiety, here.
Whereas Michigan already had medical weed legalized to make for a quicker route to starting full legislation, these states don't yet have an operational system in place. North Dakota and West Virginia also still are not operational yet, nor in Louisiana or Arkansas. Ohio is also behind schedule, having been unable to meet their goal of having operational dispensaries two years after voting for legalization. And until those are operational, the Ohio Board of Pharmacy ruled that any CBD products not sold in dispensaries licensed by the state's program are illegal.
First… hemp, cannabis, marijuana (slang term)… they’re from the exact same plant species – Cannabis sativa. It’s common to mistake hemp and cannabis unless you know why they’re different. The easiest way to tell? If it’s under .3% THC content then it’s hemp and is classified as legal for academic and educational purposes, according to federal law. What is commonly referred to as cannabis (or medical marijuana) contains THC levels above .3% and can extend into levels between 15-30% THC. Remember, THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the psychoactive component of cannabis. Without these higher THC levels, there are no psychoactive effects for you.
For example, prosecution of misdemeanor marijuana cases in Tarrant County has increased seven times the state average since the beginning of the current district attorney's administration, exceeding even more conservative neighboring jurisdictions. Not to mention,  both the Republican governor and the Texas Republican platform support decriminalization of marijuana.
Because they can’t. In most states, veterinarians risk losing their licenses if they recommend cannabinoids for pets. That may start to change soon though. Colorado is leading the charge in this, as in so many cannabinoid-related issues. And legislation is in the works in both New York and California that would allow veterinarians to legally discuss the use of cannabis products with their clients.

Outside of those four states, consumers must put their trust in the manufacturer. Sometimes that’s warranted, and sometimes it’s not. In 2016 and 2016, the FDA ran tests on several CBD products and found that many of the products had far less CBD than advertised, and in some cases none at all. You can find those test results here for 2015, and here for 2016. (These FDA tests were done as a one-off project. CBD products are not approved by the FDA for the prevention, mitigation, or treatment of any disease or condition.) 
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