Transparency: cbdMD seems to be going through a transition with their third-party testing practices. Until recently, they only released a lab report for the CBD concentrate they use for all their products, but would not show potency testing for individual products. That seems to be changing. Currently, the only lab report on the website is for their concentrate (and it’s over a year old). But if you contact customer service, they’ll send you a lab report for any product. 

Most products labeled "hemp oil" do not contain any CBD. Those are typically hemp seed oil which is more commonly used for cooking or to make salad dressing. If you want to buy CBD oil, you'll want to look for products that are labeled "CBD oil" or "hemp extract." To confirm that a product you're interested in has CBD in it, you'll want to look at their third-party lab reports. All reputable companies selling CBD oil products will make third-party lab reports available to you to confirm the presence of CBD.


Customer Service: There are multiple ways to get in touch with customer service, and Pure Hemp Botanicals’ customer service representatives are both quick to respond and forthcoming with information. On the down side, free shipping kicks in at $100 — otherwise it’s a pricey $9.99 flat rate. And you can return products, but only if they’re unopened.

When it comes to buying CBD oil, you must be exceedingly cautious because there is a tremendous amount of misinformation and outright deceit within the industry. Many online resources may try to mislead you for profit or other disingenuous reasons. For instance, some Cannabidiol oil companies advertise that their products contain a specific concentration of CBD (displayed in either percentages or milligrams (mg). However, independent research has shown that many of these sellers and their products do not live up to their claims as their products contain far less CBD than they state in print. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued warning letters to specific companies in 2016 because their products were found to contain far less CBD than advertised.
As mentioned above, CBD is no longer considered a Schedule I controlled substance under the Farm Act. However, under the DEA’s definition, it remains on the list. This allows for individual states to create exceptions to the status of CBD, even when cultivated from hemp plants grown legally under the act. It also maintains illegal status for any CBD sourced from plants produced in settings that are not consistent with that Act, or by an unlicensed grower. It is expected that more clarification on the status of CBD will come early this year (2019).

Generalized pain, for instance, has dozens upon dozens of high profile research and clinical studies that have been carried out in universities and laboratories around the globe. One of the most well-publicized of these studies took place back in 2008, in which results determined that “cannabinoid analgesics (pain relievers) have generally been well tolerated in clinical trials … with acceptable adverse event profiles (meaning acceptable effectiveness for practical use).


You are likely very familiar with the dangers that prescription painkillers (and other pharmaceuticals) present. In fact, it’s estimated that the majority of CBD oil users attempt to switch to the all-natural therapy for the precise reason of kicking prescription med habits, which all too often cause an overwhelming array of irritability, sleep disruption, digestive complications, and even thoughts of suicide.

Outside of those four states, consumers must put their trust in the manufacturer. Sometimes that’s warranted, and sometimes it’s not. In 2016 and 2016, the FDA ran tests on several CBD products and found that many of the products had far less CBD than advertised, and in some cases none at all. You can find those test results here for 2015, and here for 2016. (These FDA tests were done as a one-off project. CBD products are not approved by the FDA for the prevention, mitigation, or treatment of any disease or condition.)
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