Despite the many states that have legalized some or all forms of marijuana, federally the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) continues to classify CBD as a Schedule I drug. Schedule I drugs are defined by the DEA as "drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse." This is how not just CBD, but the entire cannabis plant is classified.

So how does it work? Scientists are still working out the details of how CBD works to calm the mind, though it seems that its effects on serotonin and glutamate production are part of that equation. This comprehensive 2015 review of scientific literature on CBD as a potential treatment for anxiety concluded that CBD has considerable potential and strongly recommended further study.
The researchers were able to show that the patients who received the CBD oil were less interested and less excited about the cigarette cues created by the researchers, which suggests that CBD itself could help reduce impulses to continue using. CBD has also been explored as a potential treatment for opiate abuse, though given the fraught legal and ethical landscape surrounding opiate addiction, solid studies on CBD for painkiller abuse are few and far between.

The common consensus among vape pen CBD oil users is that it’s a healthier option than other methods of consumption — namely smoking. Also, most users would probably agree that quality vape liquid produces more potent (and ultimately more effective) therapeutic results. This is even the case for some patients that suffer from debilitating chronic conditions like pain, inflammation, and severe forms of depression and anxiety.
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